FAQs

Is there a possibility that a thermostat will not provide enough heat to the engine?

Under normal cooling system conditions a properly functioning thermostat starts to allow engine cooling only when the engine starts to reach operating temperature. Until that point the thermostat remains closed, ensuring the engine reaches the proper operating temperature. As thermostats wear, the valve may start to not completely return to the closed position. This could result in the engine not reaching operating temperature. This can be noticed in the temperature gauge reading, but most commonly detected by lack of cabin heat during the winter months.

Is there a possibility that a thermostat will provide too much heat to the engine?

Under normal cooling system conditions a properly functioning thermostat limits engine heat once the engine reaches operating temperature. As thermostats wear, the valve may start to not open to its full range. This could result in the engine reaching temperatures higher than the proper operating temperature. This can be noticed in the temperature gauge reading or instrumental panel indicator light. This can result in engine damage and the vehicle should not be driven until the thermostat has been changed. It is important to note that other cooling system components could be degraded or failing and causing the increase in temperature instead.

Why should a Fail-Safe thermostat be used?

The patented Fail-Safe thermostat is the only thermostat in use world-wide that is designed to help in protecting your engine in the event of an overheating situation.

Why should your gas cap be free from leaks?

Annually, 30 gallons of fuel vapors can be released annually from a leaking gas cap.